[The Greatest Rock Albums of the 80s] THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT – The Turn Of A Friendly Card

the-alan-parsons-project-the-turn-of-a-friendly-card

THE TURN OF A FRIENDLY CARD

Released: November 1, 1980
Genre: Progressive Rock / Art Rock
Duration: 40:25
Label: Arista
Producer(s): Alan Parsons

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OVERVIEW

It’s time for some fine progressive rock, coming directly from one of the pioneers of the genre – the British rockers The Alan Parsons Project. “The Turn of a Friendly Card” opens up a door to the world of gambling by offering a brilliant selection of tunes, dealing with the theme. Often referred to as their most memorable and ear-pleasing work, featuring two of their greatest hits of all time “Games People Play” and “Time”, the record stood the test of time and is still on top of people’s minds when talking about progressive rock. Naturally, it became a commercial success as well, peaking at #13 on the Billboard 200 Chart. “The Turn of a Friendly Card” offers vocal variety and strength as throughout the album we get to hear Eric Woolfson’s delightful debut as a lead vocalist (“Time”), Chris Rainbow, Lenny Zakatek and Elmer Gantry. The record is well-produced, imaginative and highly enjoyable. Definitely one step away from the pretentious, overly-dramatic and world-spinning progressive music of the 70s but it still carrying out its idea in quite the exquisite way.

The sensitive ballad “Time”, the album’s finest work, is a song which can dissolve even the toughest, most resilient soul after just one listen. A song drifting away from the main theme of the album but if I may say their most beautiful work with some of the saddest lyrics in music history…”Goodbye my love, Maybe for forever, Goodbye my love, The tide waits for me, Who knows when we shall meet again, If ever…” If that doesn’t make you feel like you need a hug and a shoulder to cry on, then you truly are made of stone. The essence of the song comes from the superb vocal debut of Eric Woolfson who just makes the whole journey so much more enchanting. The synthesizer-driven “Games People Play” is another classic, captivating with its thrilling intro that transforms into a great mid-tempo rocker. “The Gold Bug” is a spellbinding instrumental that is often referred to as one of the band’s finest instrumentals. “Snake Eyes” is the album’s hidden rhythmic treasure, leaving us with a little sweet reggae aftertaste. The powerful but anxious title track, performed by Chris Rainbow, delivers a strong message with its lyrics, “…And they think it will make their lives easier, For God knows up till now it’s been hard, But the game never ends when your whole world depends, On the turn of a friendly card”.  The song is sending me to another century with its mysterious, quite antique atmosphere.

 “The Turn of a Friendly Card” is an album that can satisfy the desires of both progressive rock and pop fans. That doesn’t mean it lacks imagination or that it doesn’t tempt us with its thoughtful themes and interpretations. On the contrary, it’s one of the most curious and alluring albums from the early years of the 80s. Needless to say, it’s also an absolute favorite of mine.  

Listen and enjoy!

 

Tracklist:

“May Be a Price to Pay”
“Game People Play”
“Time”
“I Don’t Wanna Go Home”
“The Gold Bug”
“The Turn of a Friendly Card” (Part One)
“Snake Eyes”
“The Ace of Swords”
“Nothing Left To Lose”
“The Turn of a Friendly Card” (Part Two)

 

Time

Games People Play

I Don’t Wanna Go Home

 The Turn Of A Friendly Card


References:

“The Turn of a Friendly Card” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Turn_of_a_Friendly_Card

P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

[’80s Rock Album Focus] PINK FLOYD – A Momentary Lapse Of Reason

Pink Floyd - A momentary lapse of reason front

A Momentary Lapse Of Reason

Released: September 7, 1987
Genre: Progressive Rock
Duration: 51:14
Label: EMI / Columbia
Producer(s): Bob Ezrin, David Gilmour
Certified: 4xPlatinum (RIAA)
Singles: “On The Turning Away”, “Learning to Fly”, “On the Slip”

 

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OVERVIEW

I wanted to sit down and review this album for so long because it’s indeed one of Pink Floyd’s most memorable works and definitely one of the greatest albums of the 80s (at least to me) so you cannot imagine how excited I am to be doing this right now. On top of that, it’s “A Momentary Lapse of Reason”‘s birthday today! Such an amazing coincidence – I had literally no idea that it was today!

After the infamous 1983 “Final Cut” record, which was basically a Roger Waters solo album, people were already speculating on him possibly splitting from the band. In 1984, Roger released his first solo album – “The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking” and one year later, he officially announced his departure from the band. Though Roger chose to take on a different journey, David Gilmour was straightforward and told him that the band will continue, with or without him. Roger probably thought that the band won’t really survive without him; however David Gilmour, along with Nick Mason started recruiting some outstanding musicians and in 1987 released the highly controversial and expected “A Momentary Lapse of Reason” which defined the new Pink Floyd and set the records straight – Pink Floyd were staying! Yes, they did lose a brilliant lyricist, a monstrous talent and a mind-blowing musician, responsible for shaping their progressive sound in the 70s, however life goes on and I truly believe that David Gilmour did an outstanding job. As a matter of fact, “A Momentary Lapse of Reason” and the following 1992 album – “The Division Bell” are probably my two most favourite Pink Floyd albums. I think it’s generational – I was born in the early 90s and I grew up with their later albums and David Gilmour’s Pink Floyd.

“A Momentary Lapse of Reason” is often misunderstood and extremely underrated record, despite magnificent songs such as “Learning to Fly”, “Sorrow” and “On The Turning Away”. I often clash with lack of objectivity when it comes to this album and it’s quite unpleasing to keep on reading how this album “lacks the vision or the brilliant lyrical skills of Roger Waters” so I will try to move away from that and express my love towards this album and those songs. I don’t know, maybe it’s just me, but I truly feel one with this record.

“Learning to Fly” is such a calming and peaceful song and so beautifully done. I adore David Gilmour’s vocal delivery on this track – it really makes me feel so hopeful and comfortable. “Sorrow” is the album’s hidden treasure – a track which should’ve been released as a single, definitely. It captivates with its strong guttural guitar sound and haunting layered vocals. “On The Turning Away” makes me quite sad and reminds me a lot of “Comfortably Numb”  from the Wall. The third single – “One Slip” brings me back to the old-school days of Pink Floyd and I’m a huge fan of the scary intro. Turn the volume to the max when you play the thrilling “Yet Another Movie”– I guarantee that it will send you to another universe! Friendlier sounds and approaches do indeed suit Pink Floyd and I could easily feel how confident David and the other musicians were while making and recording this album.

Listen to “A Momentary Lapse of Reason” with an open heart and forget about Roger Waters for a second. It’s a fine album – one of the finest as a matter of fact! It’s intense, calming; heavy and hopeful at the same time. David’s guitar and vocals deliver the whole range of emotions. It would take them a few more years before “The Division Bell” and mastering their own unique new-Pink-Floyd-sound, however with tracks like “Learning to Fly” and “On The Turning Away” this record kicks some serious ass!

Enjoy it!

 

Tracklist:

“Signs of Life”
“Learning to Fly”
“The Dogs of War”
“One Slip”
“On the Turning Away”
“Yet Another Movie”
“A New Machine Part 1”
“Terminal Frost”
“A New Machine Part 2”
“Sorrow”

 

Learning to Fly

On The Turning Away

One Slip

Sorrow

 


 

References:
“A Momentary Lapse of Reason” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Momentary_Lapse_of_Reason
 
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
Cheers~
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.

The Story of Pink Floyd’s “Have a Cigar”

Nothing better to do on a hot Saturday afternoon than going through the music catalog of Pink Floyd (at least to me). “Wish You Were Here” (1975) is definitely one of their most outstanding records and song such as “Wish You Were Here”, “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” and “Welcome to the Machine” are absolute classics that will never become too old to listen. Not to mention “Have a Cigar” which actually made me fall in love with the album itself and quickly became a personal favorite. The track impresses not only with its memorable opening riffs and exciting synthesizer sound effects, but with its intense lyrics, dealing with the hypocrisy and greed in the music business.

 


 

– The lead vocals are provided by folk singer Roy Harper. Here’s what David Gilmour said about that:

Roger had a go at singing it and one or two people were unkind about his singing. One or two people then asked me to have a go at it. I did, but I wasn’t comfortable. I had nothing against the lyrics. Maybe the range and intensity wasn’t right for my voice. I can distinctly remember Roy leaning on the wall outside Abbey Road, while we were nattering away and (growls) ‘Go on, lemme have a go, lemme have a go.’ We all went, ‘Shut up Roy.’ But eventually we said, ‘Go on then, Roy, have your bloody go.’ Most of us enjoyed his version, though I don’t think Roger ever liked it.”

– This is one of the two songs of Pink Floyd, not sung by one of the members of the band. The other one is “The Great Gig in the Sky”, performed by Clare Torry.

– The song’s music and lyrics were written by Roger Waters. The track, much like “Welcome to the Machine” is about all the lies music industry corporations tell and the control they exercise over their musicians. Cliché lines such as “You’re gonna go far,” “I’ll tell you the name of the game,” “You’re going to make it,” are all written to illustrate the empty promises music businessmen make, especially to the new bands when in fact they only think of how to squeeze money out of them. The line “We call it riding the gravy train” has been commonly used to refer to the exploitative nature of the music corporations.

– The line, “By the way, which one’s Pink?” is a question many people in the music world kept on asking Pink Floyd.

“We did have people who would say to us “Which one’s Pink” and stuff like that. There were an awful lot of people who thought Pink Floyd was the name of the lead singer and that was Pink himself and the band. That’s how it all came about, it was quite genuine,” said David Gilmour in 1992.

(Roger Waters was always quite bitter and cynical with his lyrics, but that’s why we love his works so much. The song is one huge satirical take on the music industry – probably the best of its kind. I guess after “The Dark Side of the Moon” the industry was pretty harsh on them and expected a huge follow-up album. “Have a Cigar” was simply their answer to the soulless record companies.)

– The track begins with a very memorable swirling riff, played on electric guitar and bass. Throughout the song, we can hear a mixture of electric piano, synthesizer parts, concluding with the sound of a radio being dialed off-station. The effect is used to the following title-track “Wish You Were Here”.

“Have a Cigar” was a whole track on which I used the guitar and keyboards at once. There are some extra guitars which I dubbed on later, but I did the basic guitar tracks at one time,” said David Gilmour in 1975.

 


And this is why you should not have cigars!!! (I’m kiddin, of course) Roger Waters apparently was too sick and the tech guy made a mess with the backing vocals…


 

“Have a Cigar” Lyrics

Come in here, dear boy, have a cigar.
You’re gonna go far, you’re gonna fly high,
You’re never gonna die, you’re gonna make it if you try; they’re gonna love you.

Well, I’ve always had a deep respect, and I mean that most sincerely.
The band is just fantastic, that is really what I think.
Oh by the way, which one’s Pink?

And did we tell you the name of the game, boy?
We call it Riding the Gravy Train.

We’re just knocked out.
We heard about the sell out.
You gotta get an album out,
You owe it to the people. We’re so happy we can hardly count.

Everybody else is just green, have you seen the chart?
It’s a helluva start, it could be made into a monster
If we all pull together as a team.

And did we tell you the name of the game, boy?
We call it Riding the Gravy Train.

pink floyd keep calm and have a cigar


 

References:
Pink Floyd Lyrics, retrieved from http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/pinkfloyd/haveacigar.html
“Have a Cigar” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Have_a_Cigar
“Have a Cigar” Song Facts, retrieved from http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1389
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
Cheers~
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.

Pink Floyd – The Division Bell ALBUM REVIEW

Division Bell


THE DIVISION BELL

Released: March 28, 1994
Length: 66:32
Label: EMI, Columbia
Producer(s): Bob Ezrin, David Gilmour
Singles: “Take it Back”, “High Hopes”
Certified: 3xPlatinum (RIAA)
Tracklist:
“Cluster One” (Instrumental)
“What Do You Want from Me”
“Poles Apart”
“Marooned” (Instrumental)
“A Great Day for Freedom”
“Wearing the Inside Out”
“Take it Back”
“Coming Back to Life”
“Keep Talking”
“Lost for Words”
“High Hopes”

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OVERVIEW:

It was up to David Gilmour to keep Pink Floyd alive, after the departure of Roger Waters. In 1994, they released The Division Bell – the second, post-Waters album which proved that Pink Floyd was just as much David Gilmour, as it was Roger Waters. Yes, Pink Floyd were at their finest when the outstanding guitar playing of David Gilmour was perfectly aligned with Roger Waters’ genius lyrical and songwriting skills – that’s how unbeatable classics like “The Dark Side of the Moon” or “Wish You Were Here” were crafted, actually. However, if we put aside our nostalgia and listen with an open mind and heart, we could easily feel the greatness of The Division Bell because it truly is a dramatic record that can stir your emotions, quite violently if I may say. Moreover, David Gilmour and the rest of the band are shining in ways we never saw before. It’s an amazing album and it’s definitely worth listening to!

The Division Bell is a very heroic and successful attempt at bringing back the classical sound and feel of Pink Floyd. Compared to their previous album – A Momentary Lapse Of Reason, the sound of The Division Bell is much smoother, warmer and sincere. David Gilmour’s music is definitely more peaceful and thoughtful than Waters and we can clearly see that in songs such as “A Great Day For Freedom” and “Coming Back to Life”. However, his ultimate strength remains in his composing, playing and singing. Together with keyboard virtuoso Richard Wright, great testimonies of music craftsmanship were made in the face of the bluesy “What Do You Want From Me” and the timeless instrumental “Marooned” which even got them a Grammy Award for best instrumental. The highlight of the album has to be “High Hopes” which easily controls our emotions with its haunting aura, brilliant lyrics, melancholic piano chords and, of course, that memorable bell in the background. “Keep Talking” is probably one of the album’s weakest moments, though it does include a narration by Stephen Hawking. The pop, U2-sounding “Take it Back”, though released as a single, is quite inconsistent and out of place, though its intro and beautiful vocals do earn them some points.

Despite the huge amount of mud that was thrown and David Gilmour’s efforts to revive the band after the departure of Roger Waters, he kept on making outstanding music. Don’t expect classic ‘70s Pink Floyd sound, expect ‘90s Pink Floyd sound. The Division Bell has some weak and incongruent points and Roger Waters’ harsh and scathing lyrics are truly missed. However, the moment you play songs such as “High Hopes” and “What Do You Want From Me”, all is forgiven and forgotten. Fans’ views are conflicting but all I can say is that David Gilmour is one truly inspiring musician and we can’t but admire his band loyalty and his beautiful brainchild – The Division Bell.


High Hopes

What Do You Want From Me

Take It Back

Marooned (Instrumental)


References:
The Division Bell” official Wikipedia webpage: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Division_Bell
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
Cheers~

Celebrating the Progressive Rock Album Art of Roger Dean

Album artworks are such an important part of a record. I have previously expressed my opinions on the issue and if you are curious to find out the stories behind some of the most iconic classic rock album artworks, you can read my previous publication here:

[Click Here] Behind some of the Most Iconic Classic Rock Album Artworks

Now, I would like to specifically focus on the famous artist Roger Dean whose imagination and talent covered the albums of so many amazing bands and musicians, such as ASIA, YES, Uriah Heep and many more. Roger Dean went far and beyond in his futuristic artworks. From fantastical creatures, to mysterious galaxies, his inventiveness stood the test of time and till today, he is often credited as one of the most inspirational and important progressive graphic designers. Not to mention his contributions to the popularization and vision of progressive rock. His works are absolute classics and how can they not be? He is responsible for creating the visual identities of so many bands and artists. That’s why I decided to dedicate this publication to (some of) his incredible art and hopefully remind you guys of these timeless records who became so famous not only because of the music, but because of their visual appeal, courtesy of Roger Dean!


 

ASIA

ASIA (1982)

Asia - Asia Cover

ALPHA (1983)

Asia - Alpha Album Cover

ARIA (1994)

Asia Aria Album Art

AURA (2001)

Asia Aura albm art

PHOENIX (2008)

asia phoenix album art

OMEGA (2010)

asia omega album art

XXX (2012)

Asia xxx album art.jpg

GRAVITAS (2014)

asia gravitas album art


 

YES

FRAGILE (1971)

Yes - Fragile - Roger Dean

CLOSE TO THE EDGE (1972)

CLOSE TO THE EDGE (1972) YES

YESTERDAYS (1975)

YESTERDAYS (1975) YES

DRAMA (1980)

DRAMA (1980) YES

CLASSIC YES (1981)

CLASSIC YES (1981) YES

UNION (1991)

UNION (1991) YES

Symphonic Music of Yes (1993)

Symphonic Music of Yes (1993)

OPEN YOUR EYES (1997)

OPEN YOUR EYES (1997) YES

THE LADDER (1999)

THE LADDER (1999) YES

House of Yes: Live from House of Blues (2000)

House of Yes Live from House of Blues (2000)

In a Word: Yes (1969–) (2002)

In a Word Yes (1969–)

HEAVEN & EARTH (2014)

HEAVEN & EARTH (2014)

Like It Is: Yes at the Bristol Hippodrome (2014)

Like It Is Yes at the Bristol Hippodrome (2014)

Like It Is: Yes at the Mesa Arts Center (2015)

Like It Is Yes at the Mesa Arts Center (2015)


 

URIAH HEEP

DEMONS AND WIZARDS (1972)

URIAH HEEP DEMONS AND WIZARDS (1972)


 

OSIBISA

OSIBISA (1971)

Osibisa_Osibisa


 

SYEVE HOWE

BEGINNINGS (1975)

STEVE HOWE BEGINNINGS

TURBULENCE (1991)

STEVE HOWE TURBULENCE


 

 BABE RUTH

FIRST BASE (1972)

BABE RUTH FIRST BASE


 

BUDGIE

SQUAWK (1972)

Squawk-cover

 


Us and Them: Symphonic Pink Floyd (1995)

Symphonic_Pink_Floyd

 


 

Credits and References:
By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1599553
By Official Yes website., Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1502119
Category:Albums with cover art by Roger Dean (artist), retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Albums_with_cover_art_by_Roger_Dean_(artist)
The far-out prog-rock album art of Roger Dean”, retrieved from http://www.nme.com/photos/the-far-out-prog-rock-album-art-of-roger-dean/211255#/photo/2#IVkoPr8rRmouYhww.99
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the credits and rights go to the owners/publishers. The publications is merely a collection of visual artworks made by Roger Dean.
Cheers!
THIS BLOG claims no credit for any images posted on this site unless otherwise noted. Images on this blog are copyright to its respectful owners. If there is an image appearing on this blog that belongs to you and do not wish for it appear on this site, please E-mail with a link to said image and it will be promptly removed.

The Story of PINK FLOYD’s “MONEY”

Dark_Side_of_the_Moon“The Dark Side of the Moon” by Pink Floyd is one of those records that not only changed the face of the industry but became a synonym of brilliance in music-writing by combining together art, progressive sound and abstract lyrics. The two singles from the album – “Money” and “Time” will always be epitomized as two of the greatest masterpieces in rock music, being loved by fans and critics all over the world. It’s difficult to measure the legacy of the album, as its uniqueness and conceptualism influenced so many aspects of modern music and encouraged countless artists. Indeed, the album is an absolute “pivotal point” in rock music history.
Going back to the two singles of the album, I thought that it’s high time I explored the history of a song by Pink Floyd. As I said before, I really enjoy digging up some background information and facts about the songs I love and appreciate so much. Naturally, when I think of Pink Floyd, the first song that comes to my mind is “Money” because it’s probably my favorite PF song. So for today’s “The Story of…” publication, we are going to learn more about “Money” and enjoy its absolute excellence. Here we go…


“Money” was written by Roger Waters and was released in 1973 as a single from Pink Floyd’s album “The Dark Side of the Moon”. ( It’s essential to say that the album was engineered by the mastermind Alan Parsons at Abbey Road Studios. You might know him as the leader of his own band called The Alan Parsons Project. He remains as one of the most notable music engineers and producers in the music industry.)

– The lead vocals are performed by David Gilmour who is also responsible for the acclaimed guitar solo.

– The song became the band’s first USA hit – it peaked at #13 on US Billboard Hot 100 In France, the song was able to climb up to #6 and in Austria, it got to #10. (P.S. – The song was released as a single only in the USA – in the UK, singles were not as common, due to people perceiving them as a sellout.)

“Money” is noted for the tape loop of a cash register which plays throughout the whole song. Roger Waters was the one who put together all the money-related sounds, cutting the tape in a rhythmic pattern so that we can get the “cash register” loop effect.

– Various studio effects were used on this song. At that time – 1973, there weren’t any digital recorders or samplers, or computers – so the layering of sounds was indeed very complicated. Pink Floyd used a new 16-track recorder but still – in the 70s, if you want to copy and paste something, the only way to do it is with a razor blade and splicing tape.


“Money”, along with another song from the album – “Us and Them”, are the only two songs from “The Dark Side of the Moon” to use saxophone, played by Dick Parry. At that time, the band was experimenting with different sound combinations. (The results were pretty awesome, though!)


– The song has very unusual time signatures. It begins with 7/4, then it changes to 4/4, then it returns to 7/4 and it ends in 4/4. In 1993, David Gilmour said, “It’s Roger’s riff. Roger came in with the verses and lyrics for ‘Money’ more or less completed. And we just made up middle sections, guitar solos and all that stuff. We also invented some new riffs – we created a 4/4 progression for the guitar solo and made the poor saxophone player play in 7/4. It was my idea to break down and become dry and empty for the second chorus of the solo.”

– The song had to be re-recorded for the 1981 Pink Floyd release – A Collection of Great Dance Songs, because Capitol Records was refusing to license the track to Columbia Records in the United States.

MONEY PINK FLOYD 2
Cover of the French Single

– Lyrically, the song is about all the bad things money can bring to you. Ironic, isn’t it? – The record made Pink Floyd tons of cash as it sold over 34 million copies.

– People might often misinterpret the song as a tribute to money. The famous line “Money, it’s a gas,” made people believe that they sing about money being a good thing.

– The lyrics were written as a reflection of British economy back in the 70s. However, I believe that the words are applicable nowadays more than ever.

“Share it fairly, but don’t take a slice of my pie,” is also one of the most famous lines of the song. I think it really represents people’s selfishness when it comes to fighting for equality.

“Money, it’s a hit,” – a line referring to money as being like a drug. People can become addicted and can’t really get enough of it. We simply spend our lives trying to get more and more…

“Money, so they say, is a root of all evil today” is a paraphrased line, taken from the New Testament – 1 Timothy 6:10: “For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil.”

– The lyrics of “Money” are briefly referenced in the film “Pink Floyd – The Wall”, when Pink – the main protagonist is being caught writing poems in his class. The teacher reads some lines from the poem book out loud – those lines are the verse of “Money”.

– Pink Floyd are trying to show how greedy the world has become…A theme that will always be relevant, especially since nowadays we live in a materialistic society, which only cares about possessions and status.

– Personally, I think the song fits perfectly to the album and its concept. Also I really admire how the lyrics bring together insanity, addiction, greed and money. When you feel the smell of money, people instantly change and are willing to do whatever it takes for more money. Throughout the years, Pink Floyd were labelled as hypocrites, because they sing about money being evil, when in fact they earned millions of dollars. I don’t necessarily agree with this statement but I guess everyone is entitled to their own opinion. Let me here what you guys think?

LYRICS:

Money, get away
Get a good job with good pay and you’re okay
Money, it’s a gas
Grab that cash with both hands and make a stash
New car, caviar, four star daydream
Think I’ll buy me a football team

Money, get back
I’m all right Jack keep your hands off of my stack
Money, it’s a hit
Don’t give me that do goody good bullshit
I’m in the high-fidelity first class traveling set
And I think I need a Lear jet

Money, it’s a crime
Share it fairly but don’t take a slice of my pie
Money, so they say
Is the root of all evil today
But if you ask for a raise it’s no surprise
That they’re giving none away
Away, away, way
(Away, away, away, away)

– The Music Video for “Money” features numerous scenes, showing how people make and spend their money. In addition, there are many scenes, including coins spinning, money being count, etc. It just makes you think – what a huge mess can this little thing cause.

– In 2015, Roger Waters was asked by Uncut whether there’s a song that reminds him of Roger Waters. He replied, “Money.’ I’m not talking about the lyric. Just the quirky 7/8 time reminds me of Roger. It’s not a song I would have written. It points itself at Roger.”

“Money” has always been a “must-play” song for any of Pink Floyd’s live concerts. David Gilmour even played it last year, during the first date of Rattle That Lock Tour.

(Notice the difference in the “live experience”…Is it just me or nowadays the audiences are too stiff….)

I would like to finish by saying that it’s been more than 30 years since the song was released, but fans still can’t get the “cash register sound” or the guitar riff out of their heads – the song is just that good. Every time I think of the 70s, this is the first song that comes to my mind. It’s not like I was born in the 70s, but to me, this song represents the era and the direction many musicians started taking at that time – more progressive, art-driven and experimenting by combining various instruments. The lyrics of the song are very essential and I really appreciate it when musicians are so skillfully conveying a message with just so few words… Furthermore, can we talk about the guitar solo of the song? I mean, we all know that Dave is a guitar virtuoso, but this right here gets things to a whole new level…
I do hope you guys love the song as much as I do and you learned a thing or two from this publication. Stay tuned for more “The Story of…” publications to find out more about our most favorite classic rock tunes.
Cheers.


References:
Money by Pink Floyd, retrieved from http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=1689
Money by Pink Floyd, retrieved from http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/2811/
Money by Pink Floyd Lyrics, retrieve from http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/2811/
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

The Very Best of Emerson, Lake & Palmer

Keith Emerson – the keyboardist of the progressive rock supergroup Emerson, Lake & Palmer has died today at the age of 71. It’s only March, but 2016 already took the lives of so many notable and legendary figures of rock music – I don’t really know what to say, except feel sad about it and pay tribute to those artists who made such a huge difference…

Emerson, Lake and Palmer are probably the first progressive rock supergroup, formed back in the 70s. With their distinctive approach, sustainability, innovation and if I may say rather classical approach to rock music established them as a radio phenomenon and gained them a solid fanbase. Their enormous commercial success opened up the doors to numerous progressive rock bands, such as YES. Progressive rock was never easy to sell to mainstream audiences, however ELP were one of those exceptions as they found a way to gain the love of millions of fans. I don’t consider ELP as one of those progressive rock bands that have a clear cut rock vision or like to stay within the boundaries of safe rock. On the contrary, in comparison to other progressive rock bands, such as YES or Pink Floyd, ELP often choose to go with more classical music adaptations, in combination with jazz and symphonic rock elements. For instance, Keith Emerson was famous for excessive use of the Hammond organ and piano, in addition to the synthesizer.

As a result, their first few albums enjoyed a massive success during the 70s – apparently mixing classical elements with rock music was their recipe for fame. They simply proved that classically-trained musicians can also be rockstars and compete for the arena-scale audiences.

The success of the band is largely credited to Keith Emerson, who was not afraid or worried with what was happening in the industry or how will people respond to their progressive musicianship. “Keith was a gentle soul whose love for music and passion for his performance as a keyboard player will remain unmatched for many years to come. He was a pioneer and an innovator whose musical genius touched all of us in the worlds of rock, classical and jazz,” says Carl Palmer.

Needless to say, Keith was a keyboard virtuoso and a music genius to whom we owe a lot. As a tribute to him, I decided to dedicate a publication to the super trio and pick up 10 of their most famous and loved songs throughout the years. It’s unfortunate that we lost another great artist but he will always be remembered and respected for his music and contributions. Let us not remember such rock icons only when they leave this world – let’s cherish and appreciate their music throughout eternity …

Trilogy (1972)

 

Lucky Man (1970)

 

From The Beginning (1972)

 

“Karn Evil 9” (1973)

 

Jerusalem (1973)

 

Knife Edge (1970)

 

C’est La Vie (1997)

 

Peter Gunn Theme (1979) [Live]

 

Fanfare for the Common Man (1977)

Still…You Turn Me On (1973)

 

Rest in peace, Keith Emerson!

 

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P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the credits and rights go to the owners and/or publishers.