Why is B.B. King and Eric Clapton’s “Riding with the King” One of My Favorite Blues Albums?

(by Velina of “My Rock Mixtapes”)

It’s no secret that I’m just as big of a blues fan as am I a glam rock one. In fact, my journey on the rock&roll appreciation lane started with the blues, naturally, and in particular with the musical love of my life – Mr. Eric Clapton. I can easily divide my musical adventures into two parts – before and after Clapton and before Clapton there was just so little. Now is the time to thank my parents who’ve been playing his songs at home since I was a little kid and lighted that blues candle inside my heart which eventually transformed into a big wild fire! I can talk about Clapton and his blues for ages because you can’t just have it any other way with him. A career that started in the early 60s, dozens of accomplishments, awards, albums, collaborations, pop culture influences and so on. Not just that but he’s still here, making music, concerts and giving his all, despite numerous health issues he’s facing due to his age. Clapton is pure class – a dying breed of musicians who just know how to sustain their genuineness and status by backing it up with quality and constant desire to make history!

I love early Clapton and everything he did with The Yardbirds, Cream, Blind Faith, etc. but late Clapton (1980s – ) has to be my favorite time of his career. “August”, “Money and Cigarettes”, “Journeyman”, “Pilgrim”, etc. – they all fall under the “my favorite works by Mr. Slowhand category”. Today, however, I want to specifically talk about one of the most respected collaborations in the recent history of blues music – Eric Clapton and B.B. King; a friendship that resulted in one of the best modern-day blues records – “Riding with the King”; a strong musical bond that gave birth to an album, without which I cannot imagine my life. Many aspects of “Riding with the King” have turned this album into one of the Top 5 albums I always recommend to people who just want to get a taste of the blues. I will briefly mention where my adoration is coming from and will let you decide whether I’m right or wrong (even though we all know I am totally right). Let’s get on that ride now!!!

The Legends

Eric Clapton, B.B. King – do I have to say more? When your name is as heavy as the Earth itself, you don’t need justification or any other form of additional explanation to why exactly your music must be heard and appreciated. Both Clapton and B.B. King are pure synonyms of the blues and have certainly been through a lot to establish themselves as such. I don’t think you need me to tell you the environment under which artists like B.B. King had to grow up and what they had to fight and overcome to secure the future of blues music and eventually rock&roll. It’s because of the sweat and tears of those great African-American bluesmen that the world managed to experience not just musical but cultural revolution and learn how to celebrate people of every color and music of every genre, basically. “The king of Blues” is certainly known for many things, but he will always be remembered for living life on the stage. It’s that immense dedication to the public that drove him to perform till his very last breath and forever be refered to as one of the kings of the blues guitar.

Eric Clapton rose to stardom after his early days in the Yardbirds. He quickly proved that he wasn’t just your regular white English boy, trying to play the blues. He had the talent, the vision, the heart… It’s been an ongoing, never-stopping career full of ups and downs, personal struggles, self-discovery and tons of other life challenges, all of which Clapton faced with a guitar hanging on his neck. You don’t need me to tell you why he’s a legend and why he’s everyone’s favorite guitar hero. “Clapton is God” many say, and you have a 50-year-old career to investigate if you don’t agree.

Clapton met B.B. King in the late ‘60s and ever since, it’s been a dream of him to record with one of his all-time idols. It wasn’t until the late ‘90s when the two of them finally made some serious musical magic together for B.B. King’s duets album, “Deuces Wild”. After the foundations of the friendship were strengthened it was a matter of time before those two make something precious out of it. After all, you rarely have so much potential in one place.
3 years later, “Riding with the King” finally materialized and everyone was more than happy with the results. Clapton put everything into his album – from picking the song to co-producing the album, “Riding with the King” turned into a very important turning point for the career of then 55-year-old Clapton. The best thing is that he perfectly knew who’s he recording with and didn’t even for a second try to outstage him or become the center of it all. You can quickly notice that B.B. King is leading on the majority of songs as Clapton is taking the backseat. That my friend is called respect and is one of my favorite aspects of this album.

The Songs & the Sound

(Vintage meets Modern)

eric clapton bb king riding with the king album cover12 gorgeous manifestations of blues music have been put together for “Riding with the King”. Among them we can find classic B.B. King songs from the 50s and the 60s, as well as other vintage blues covers and interpretations. The title song, which easily could be referred to as the highlight of the album, is written by John Hiatt for his sixth album (1983) and surprise – it’s about the king of Rock&Roll, Elvis Presley! For BB and Clapton’s album, Hiatt had to redo the lyrics a little bit to fit the new production and style and of course – for the King of Blues. The result was phenomenal. The cover is certainly a refreshing twist on the song and definitely the better version (at least in my own humble opinion). Who says blues is boring? “Riding with the King” has to be one of the most empowering, uplifting and day-improving tunes of the genre. I can always count on this song to help me go through the day and kick me with that much needed thrill.

Another extremely refreshing moment is “Marry You”, which is not often mentioned by fans and critics when it comes to this album, yet I strongly support its relevance and immense contribution to turning this project into the perfect modern-day blues record. “Three O’Clock Blues” is one of BB’s specialties and a kind reminder of why this whole collaboration was indeed a great idea put together at a great time. Same goes for “Ten Long Years” which every self-respected blues fan gotta know. The new production and Clapton’s involvement (though supportive, rather than equal) is bringing so much color to those blues staples that at one point I just forgot those songs existed before this album. “I Wanna Be” is a splendid introduction song to a youngster, transitioning from melodic rock to the blues.

“Riding with the King” was released in 2000 and I think the time period was very crucial to the sound and thus the influence of the album. I think they couldn’t have picked a better day to make such statement. The “father/son” collaboration mixed together all the ingredients needed to please the old-school bluesmen and the newer generation of fans who at that time, given the bands which dominated the charts, probably thought they would never listen to blues music. The most attractive part of “Riding with the King” and the reason why it’s one of my favorite blues records of all time is not just the fact that it’s full of atmospheric, well-balanced compositions and not just because it’s a collaborative effort of legends like Eric Clapton and B.B. King. It’s one of my most beloved and respected works because it’s a contemporary blues record, keeping that old spirit alive and the ideal “generation-doesn’t-matter” album. I was 8 years old when the album came out and it’s been with me ever since. I’m glad I had the chance to witness its release and blossoming into what is known by fans today. Thank you B.B. King (RIP) and Clapton for keeping the blues alive.

“Riding with the King”

“Marry You”

“Three O’Clock Blues”

 


References:
Album artwork, retrieved from: https://earofnewt.com/2015/02/01/b-b-king-says-that-eric-clapton-was-like-his-girlfriend-on-riding-with-the-king/
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

The Story of BLIND FAITH’s “Can’t Find My Way Home” (1969)

Eric Clapton was part of many outstanding collaborations throughout his long and prolific career. Where do I even begin? It all started with The Yardbirds, then Cream, then John Mayall and The Bluesbreakers. Before he moved on to Derek & The Dominos – a project we all know quite well due to that “little” album “Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs”, Eric Clapton, along with Steve Winwood, Ric Grech and ex-Cream drummer Ginger Baker formed the short-lived band, Blind Faith.

blind faith 3
Blind Faith

The blues-oriented Blind Faith has often been referred to as one of the first ever supergroups. Not only that but they crafted the perfect sound fusion between rock and blues, which influenced many young musicians in the years to come. Despite releasing only one, self-titled album in 1969, Blind Faith still remain one of the most essential English-blues acts, at least in my book. That album generated a huge commotion not only because of its unique sound but because of its controversial album artwork, featuring a young topless girl, holding a silver space ship. It was still the ‘60s after all…what else could you expect?

blind faith cover“Blind Faith” offers a superb playlist; each and every song on that album is a true masterpiece and deserves our praises. After all, it did peak at #1 in three different countries (UK, USA, Canada) so you can expect nothing but the best from this album. Nevertheless, I’ve always been attracted to “Can’t Find My Way Home” the most. As a matter of fact, it’s one of my personal favorite blues songs of all time. It’s immensely comforting and definitely a song I can play every time I feel like I need a break. I do hope there are people out there who appreciate it as much as me and are interested to know a little bit more about this not only beautiful but historically relevant song. Here we go!

  • “Can’t Find My Way Home” was written and sang by the legendary Steve Winwood who is regarded as one of the most influential blue-eyed soul and rhythm and blues musicians of all time. Throughout his career, he made history as a notorious member of bands such as The Spencer Davis Group, Traffic, Go and of course, Blind Faith.
  • Eric Clapton played acoustic guitar on this song, which was highly unusual for him. As a member of CREAM, Clapton was famous for his lengthy and complex guitar solos, from which he obviously wanted to take a break. Many fans consider his gentle guitar performance on “Can’t Find My Way Home” as one of the best of his career.
  • Many have speculated about the true meaning behind the lyrics of the song. Some say this Steve is singing about break-up or the meaning of life while others claim that it’s about war and death. The most well-known interpretation of the “Can’t Find My Way Home” is that it’s merely a song about drugs.
    I am inclined to believe that it’s a song about drugs. I mean if we look carefully, Come down off your throne and leave your body alone” might be sayingget down from that grand illusion and just stop taking drugs and doing this to your body!”. The following lines, “You are the reason I’ve been waiting all these years, somebody holds the key” can be interpreted as “drugs were the reason why I can’t move on and I need someone to help me!”
    Of course, what do I know? I didn’t write the song. It might as well be a track about self-rediscovery and trying to change your life after you made a series of bad choices. Drugs might be just one small part of it. We all make mistakes, take wrong turns and as a result, can’t find our way back home; the important thing is to be sane, realize what is wrong and try to seek help.

  • “Can’t Find My Way Home” was (and still is) Blind Faith‘s most beloved song. It was an irreplaceable part of every one of their (relatively few) live performances (and later of Clapton‘s).
  • Steve Winwood and Eric Clapton performed “Can’t Find My Way Home” during the Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2007, along with Derek Trucks and Doyle Bramhall.
  • “Can’t Find My Way Home” is one of the most covered songs in the history of music. From House of Lords to Joe Cocker, from Styx to John Wetton – various musicians of different genres, including hard rock, soul and pop, recorded their own interpretations of this song. We can easily conclude that “Can’t Find My Way Home” turned out to be an inspiration for many younger generations of musicians.

    Below is my favorite cover of the classic by House of Lord (“Sahara”, 1990)
  • “Can’t Find My Way Home” often makes an appearance on TV. More recently, the famous CW TV Series, Supernatural, featured it during seasons 1 and 9.

“Can’t Find My Way Home”

Come down off your throne and leave your body alone – somebody must change
You are the reason I’ve been waiting so long – somebody holds the key
Well, I’m near the end and I just ain’t got the time
And I’m wasted and I can’t find my way home

Come down on your own and leave your body alone – somebody must change
You are the reason I’ve been waiting all these years – somebody holds the key
Well, I’m near the end and I just ain’t got the time
And I’m wasted and I can’t find my way home


References:
“Can’t Find My Way Home” Lyrics, retrieved from http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/stevewinwood/cantfindmywayhome.html
“Can’t Find My Way Home” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Can’t_Find_My_Way_Home
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

Celebrating ERIC CLAPTON’s Birthday with 10 of His Timeless Classics

ericLegendary bluesman, member of The Yardbirds, Cream, Blind Faith, Derek & The Dominos and many more, Eric Clapton, celebrates his birthday today! One of the most prolific and influential artists of all time, turns 72 so nothing but good wishes are in order! Happy Birthday, Mr. Clapton! Thank you for your devotion, hard work and exceptional music I grew up with and still can’t live without! Thank you for making me fall in love with the blues and learn how to appreciate great guitar work and technicality. Thank you for bringing peace to my life with your music!

Not many musicians can brag with a career, as long, fruitful and impressive as Eric Clapton’s. From his strong debut as a young guitar virtuoso in The Yardbirds, to recording one of the most important blues albums of all time with John Mayall & The Bluesbreakers; from a never-ending struggle with alcoholism to self-rediscovery and a powerful comeback in the ’80s, Eric Clapton’s life is surely one fascinating roller-coaster that keeps getting more and more exciting with each step of the way.

To celebrate Clapton‘s birthday, I have chosen 10 of his most beloved classics, including songs from his time as a member of The Yardbirds, Cream and Derek and the Dominos. There is certainly no better excuse to play Clapton all day long than commemorating his birthday! Let’s listen to the blues and forget about everything else! 


 

The Yardbirds – “For Your Love” (1965)

for your love


Cream – “Sunshine of Your Love” (1967)

sunshine


John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers (with Eric Clapton) – “Ramblin’ on My Mind“ (1966)

The Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton


Derek & The Dominos – “Layla” (1970)

LAYLA

Derek & The Dominos – Bell Bottom Blues (1970)

LAYLA


“Cocaine” (1977)

cocaine


“Wonderful Tonight” (1977)

wonderful tonight


“Bad Love” (1989)

eric bad love


“My Father’s Eyes” (1998)

piligrim cclapton


“Riding With the King” (2000)

riding with the king


+ “Spiral” (2016)

Eric Clapton - I Still Do (2016)


clapton70s

… Or play the entire playlist here:


 

P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

The Rolling Stones – “Blue & Lonesome” Album Review

rolling-stones-blue-and-lonesome

Blue & Lonesome

Released: December 2, 2016
Genre: Blues, Rhythm and Blues, Blues Rock
Producer(s): Don Was, The Glimmer Twins (Mick Jagger & Keith Richards)
Label: Polydor
Length: 42:36

buy-from-amazon

“Blue & Lonesome” In the Studio


OVERVIEW

Rolling Stones are surely wrapping 2016 up with a style! The rock&roll Gods are back with a phenomenal collection of spirited covers, bringing us back to the golden days of blues. “Blue & Lonesome” is Rolling Stones’ first album to feature exclusively cover songs. Among the twelve blues jewels, we get to listen to interpretations of forgotten but classic tracks by Howlin’ Wolf, Willie Dixon, Buddy Johnson, Memphis Slim and other legendary bluesmen. Long-time friend and a fellow blues musician Eric Clapton is another intriguing highlight of “Blue & Lonesome”. Clapton’s God-like guitar skills can be heard on “Everybody Knows About My Good Thing” and “I Can’t Quit You Baby”.

Recorded within just a few days, with no preparation whatsoever, “Blue & Lonesome” is the perfect example of how The Rolling Stones can effortlessly craft some serious magic out of nowhere and still sound as confident as ever. It took them a decade (their previous album -“A Bigger Bang” was released in 2005) but the Stones are back! Don’t get fooled – the all-covers track selection is certainly not a cheesy sentimental yearning for the past. It’s goes way beyond that! “Blue & Lonesome” is Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ronnie Wood and Charlie Watts having fun, sounding unbelievably fresh, and skilfully introducing blues to the younger generations. A fearless journey back to the roots, resulting in a rediscovery of self, this new album might be their best work since the classic years of the Stones.

The Glimmer Twins, along with producer Don Was are intentionally preserving the rawness and authenticity of the recording sessions, in perfect alignment with the spirit of the 50s and the 60s. Similarly to the attitude of Eric Clapton on his 2016 album “I Still Do”, the Rolling Stones are doing music their own way without a single care in the world. Not that the Stones were ever much bothered with things like keeping up the with trends or working days and nights on perfect multi-platinum singles BUT if their ultimate freedom had a name, it would be “Blue & Lonesome”.  (I am mentioning Eric Clapton because those two albums are the highlights of 2016 blues releases.)

“Just Your Fool” (Buddy Johnson) opens the door to the world of “Blue & Lonesome”. Mick Jagger is absolutely killing it on this tune – raw, brave and soulful, his vocal delivery is obviously reflecting his high level of satisfaction with this album. The slow-paced blues symphonies – “Little Rain” (Ewart G. Abner Jr. and Jimmy Reed), “All of Your Love” (Magic Sam) and the atmospheric title track “Blue & Lonesome” (Memphis Slim) are among the most memorable tunes of the album. Jagger’s harmonica is making a statement throughout the entire album, bringing us back to the early days of the Stones. Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood’s guitars are excitably racing on the blues highway, each showcasing easeful determination and laid-back energy. The terrific drum beats of Charlie Watts are breathing new life into the old blues. “Hate to See You Go” (Little Walter) – the first song to get a MV makeover is one charming and immensely uplifting trip to the 50s. “Everybody Knows About My Good Thing” is a personal favorite, mostly due to Mick Jagger’s rough, genuine vocals.

“Blue & Lonesome” offers a galvanizing experience to the roots of the Stones, yet capturing their personalities and strengths in a modern, refreshing way. It’s been a while since we’ve seen the rock&roll legends’ confidence shine so brightly on a record. They came back home!

Tracklist:

“Just Your Fool”
“Commit a Crime”
“Blue and Lonesome”
“All of Your Love”
“I Gotta Go”
“Everybody Knows About My Good Thing”
“Ride ‘Em On Down”
“Hate To See You Go”
“Hoo Doo Blues”
“Little Rain”
“Just Like I Treat You”
“I Can’t Quit You Baby”

 Hate To See You Go

Ride ‘Em On Down

Just Your Fool

Ride ‘Em On Down – Blue & Lonesome (60” clip)


References:
“Blue and Lonesome” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_%26_Lonesome_(The_Rolling_Stones_album)
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

The Triumphant Debut of BAD COMPANY (1974)

Mark Sullivan 70's Rock Archive
Bad Company, 1974

When we talk about triumphant rock debuts, the conversation should start with a few artists, including The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Boston, Van Halen, even Guns N’ Roses. Another band that most certainly deserves to be mentioned along with the big names is Bad Company. Their glorious 1974 debut achieved much more than critical and commercial success; the self-titled album of the supergroup brought good old-fashioned rock&roll back into the music scene. Filled with catchy straightforward classics, “Bad Company” is the perfect example of album oriented blues rock, showcasing the band’s biggest selling point – their moody but quite soulful signature sound.

In 1973 vocalist Paul Rodgers (Free), guitarist Mick Ralphs (Mott The Hoople), bassist Boz Burrelll (King Crimson) and drummer Simon Kirke (Free) teamed up to form one of the most gifted (at least in my opinion) British hard rock supergroups – Bad Company. One year later, their debut album became the first ever album to come out of Led Zeppelin’s Swan Song label. The record was an instant success, showcasing excellent musicianship and a brilliant formula, which they followed through the rest of the ‘70s.

bad-company-debutThe debut album topped the US Billboard chart, spent 25 weeks on the UK Albums Chart and spawned three timeless hit singles. Fans, critics – everyone was giving it their stamp of approval. The music scene in the early 70s was drowning in flamboyancy and experimentalism – nothing wrong with that of course. Among the dazzling theatrics and extravagant musical innovations, “Bad Company” was the much needed “back to the roots” record. Unpretentious, quite simple even, the debut album creates the perfect bluesy, soulful, working class rock&roll atmosphere.

paul-rogers-and-mickBad Company’s secret weapon was the strong songwriting collaboration between vocalist Paul Rodgers and blues-based guitarist Mick Ralphs, both shining as bright as the Sun on the self-titled effort. Loaded with classic rock staples like “Can’t Get Enough”, “Rock Steady” and “Ready for Love”, the record was destined for success. Interestingly, even the more dynamic songs on “Bad Company” are fueled with a sense of danger, under an umbrella of gloom. That’s definitely the ultimate charm of the band and ultimately the record itself – moody but instantly captivating. I have always found an immense attachment to “Ready for Love” (original by Mott the Hoople). Paul Rodgers’ vocals absolutely did it for me – with his sensual, quite erotic even performance, he simply immortalized it. The title track is another high point from the record – I have never witnessed such a brilliant synergy between piano and rock&roll. Not to mention the intriguing theme of the song – a band of fugitives and “rebel souls” that carry nothing but trouble with them! Sounds like a good soundtrack, doesn’t it?

If you want to get into Bad Company, this is the record you should start with. Play it as loud as possible if you want to experience the ageless magic of pure hard solid rock&roll. This album (along with a couple of more, of course) defined the mid-70s and for that it truly deserves to be appreciated. “Bad Company” is a historically relevant debut and nothing can take that away from it. Hope you guys got reminded of this classic and will go play it now!

Listen to the whole album here:


References:
“Bad Company” Official Wikipedia Page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bad_Company_(album)
P.S. I don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights and credits go to the owners and/publishers.
The publication expresses my personal opinion and in no way is trying to make a generalized statement. Please be kind and considerate when you read and/or comment.
Cheers~

Eric Clapton In 10 Outstanding Live Performances

Eric Clapton Live 2You know how much I love Eric Clapton so this post should come as no surprise to you, guys. I think he is absolutely one of the last of his kind of musicians who still got it – in the record studio, as well as on stage.

The list of concerts, events and shows he did throughout his long career is never-ending but since I had to draw the line somewhere, I decided to pick 10 outstanding live performances of Eric, just for you, guys. It’s quite the task, since he doesn’t really have a weak show and he has always been giving it all on the stage. Just watch the following videos and you will understand what I’m saying.

Enjoy~

 


“I Shot the Sheriff”, 1987


“Layla”, 1992, MTV Unplugged


“Layla” (ft. Phil Collins, Live Aid 1985)


“Cocaine”, 2015


“My Father’s Eyes”, 2007


“Bad Love”, 1990


“Anyway The Wind Blows” (ft. JJ Cale, 2007)


“Tearing Us Apart” (ft. Tina Turner, Phil Collins and Dire Straits)


“Change the World”, 2007


“Tears in Heaven”, 2013


 

+ Bonus Track

Mark Knopfler, Eric Clapton, Sting & Phil Collins- Money for Nothing (Live Montserrat)

45 Years Ago We Said Goodbye to Jim Morrison

Jim Morrison, retro. RET


 

Today (July, 3) in 1971, at the age of 27 we lost the legendary Jim Morrison. He was found dead in a bathtub in Paris, France. Morrison died of a heart-attack brought on by his drug abuse. It is said that the heart attack was caused by heroin, however till today his death remains  a mystery as no one is really sure what exactly happened that night.

In 1971, after Jim recorded “LA Woman”, he decided to move to France with his then-girlfriend Pamela Courson. Here’s when the story becomes somehow blurred. His girlfriend lied several times and constantly changed her version of the story. On top of that, it’s well known that Jim Morrison didn’t like heroin and was against using it, despite the fact that Pam was a heroin drug addict. According to the story, Pam lied to Jim about what kind of a drug she was using that night. As Jim thought it was cocaine, he snorted some of the “white substance” which turned out to be heroine and had a heart attack almost immediately.  

There are several stories about how Morrison died. One version says that he died in a night club and his body was taken to the apartment. According to another version, he woke up in the morning coughing blood, then took a bath and eventually died in the bathtub. There’s even a story about him faking his own death.

the doors 4
The Doors

Regardless, we lost a true icon and one of the most legendary musicians of all time. Drugs were indeed a huge part of his life and eventually they took the most of him. However, throughout his relatively short career, he, along with the rest of the group members from The Doors accomplished so much. These rebellious psychedelic rockstars produced some of the biggest hits of the 60s and the beginning of the 70s, such as “Waiting For The Sun’, “Riders on the Storm”, “Light My Fire”, “Love Me Two Times”, “Love Her Madly” and many more. The talented yet rebellious band was formed in the mid-60s and was named after Aldous Huxley’s “The Doors of Perception”.

 

Jim Morrison grave
Jim Morrison’s Grave, Pere Lachaise Cemetary, Paris France : Credits on photo

 

Let’s celebrate the life and career of Jim by listening to some of his most famous works.

Waiting For The Sun

Light My Fire

Love Me Two Times

L.A. Woman


 

References:
“This Day In Music (July 3)”, retrieved from http://thisdayinmusic.com/
“How Did Jim Morrison Die?”, retrieved from http://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/how-did-jim-morrison-die.htmlI don’t own any audio or visual material used in this publication. All the rights/credits go to the owners and/or publishers.
Cheers

[Playlist] Classic Rock Songs for (not) Saying Goodbye

Saying goodbye might be the hardest thing in life. Whether we have to separate from a friend or someone we love, goodbyes can completely change you and leave an everlasting impact. However, the change doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad one. Sometimes people say goodbye to save themselves and start a new life. Regardless of the situation, the theme of saying farewell to a loved one or to a friend has been a popular music theme for generations. Here is a personal selection of 10 songs that deal with the issue of saying goodbye and experiencing pain when the person you love is no longer here with you. I do hope you enjoy the playlist and remind yourself of those classics! ^^

PLAYLIST:

Def Leppard – Goodbye
Bon Jovi – Never Say Goodbye
Eric Clapton – Tears in Heaven
Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday
Motley Crue – Time For Change
Simple Minds – Don’t You Forget About Me
Ozzy Osbourne – See You On The Other Side
The Guess Who – No Time

+Blues Bonus

Roy Orbison – Cryin
Bill Withers – Ain’t No Sunshine


Def Leppard – Goodbye

You won’t ever have to say goodbye
You won’t ever have to say “I’ve wasted all my time”
If the dream you dream ain’t what it seems
Just look into my eyes
You won’t ever have to say goodbye…


Bon Jovi – Never Say Goodbye

Remember how we used to talk
About busting out – we’d break their hearts
Together – forever
Never say goodbye, never say goodbye
You and me and my old friends
Hoping it would never end
Say goodbye, never say goodbye
Holdin’ on – we got to try
Holdin’ on to never say goodbye


Eric Clapton – Tears in Heaven

Would you know my name
If I saw you in heaven?
Would it be the same
If I saw you in heaven?
I must be strong
And carry on,
‘Cause I know I don’t belong
Here in heaven…


Rolling Stones – Ruby Tuesday

She would never say where she came from
Yesterday don’t matter if it’s gone
While the sun is bright
Or in the darkest night
No one knows
She comes and goes
Goodbye, Ruby Tuesday
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I’m gonna miss you…


Motley Crue – Time For Change

The lines on their faces so deep, yeah
A revolution, or reach out
And touch the day
We’re overdue, child
Change
Now it’s time for change
Nothing stays the same
Now it’s time for change…


Simple Minds – Don’t You Forget About Me

…Love’s strange so real in the dark
Think of the tender things that we were working on
Slow change may pull us apart
When the light gets into your heart, baby
Don’t You Forget About Me
Don’t Don’t Don’t Don’t
Don’t You Forget About Me…


Ozzy Osbourne – See You On The Other Side

Leaving, I Hate To See You Cry
Grieving, I Hate To Say Goodbye
Dust And Ash Forever, Yeah
Though I Know We Must Be Parted
As Sure As Stars Are In The Sky
I’m Gonna See You When It Comes To Glory
And I’ll See You, I’ll See You On The Other Side
Yes, I’ll See You, I’ll See You On The Other Side…


The Guess Who – No Time

No time for a summer friend
No time for the love you send
Seasons change and so did I
You need not wonder why
You need not wonder why
There’s no time left for you
No time left for you…


Roy Orbison – Cryin

Oh, you wished me well
You, you couldn’t tell
That I’d been crying over you
Crying over you
When you said, “So long”
Left me standing all alone
Alone and crying, crying
Crying, crying…


Bill Withers – Ain’t No Sunshine

…Hey, I oughtta leave young thing alone
But ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone
Ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone
Only darkness every day.
Ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone
And this house just ain’t no home…


References:
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Eric Clapton – “I Still Do” Album Review

Eric Clapton - I Still Do (2016)

Music legend and guitar God Eric Clapton is back with his twenty-third solo album titled “I Still Do”. The new album was officially released today (May 20) through the independent Bushbranch Records/Surfdog Records label. “I Still Do” is produced by the famous Glyn Johns who is also responsible for Clapton’s iconic “Slowhand” album which became an international success and is certified 3x-platinum by the RIAA.

“This was a long and overdue opportunity to work with Glyn Johns again, and also, incidentally, the fortieth anniversary of ‘Slowhand’!” said Eric Clapton in a statement announcing the upcoming release of I Still Do.

The 12 track record features new original songs, written by Eric Clapton and cover versions of classic songs by artists such as Robert Johnson and Bob Dylan. “I Still Do” follows up to Clapton’s hit album “The Breeze: An Appreciation of JJ Cale” released in 2014 and the commercially successful compilation album “Forever Man” and concert film and live album “Slowhand at 70 – Live at the Royal Albert Hall” released in 2015.

The distinguishable Eric Clapton artwork was painted by Sir Peter Blake who has previously worked with Clapton on his live album “24 Nights” (1991) and is famous for co-designing The Beatles’ “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” album art.


 

I STILL DO

333369-empReleased: May 20, 2016
Recorded: British Grove Studios
Genre: Blues, Rock, Pop Rock
Length: 54:07
Label: Bushbranch/Surfdog
Producer(s): Glyn Johns

 

TRACKLIST:

Alabama Woman Blues
Can’t Let You Do It
I Will Be There
Spiral
Catch The Blues
Cypress Grove
Little Man, You’ve Had a Busy Day
Stones In My Passway
I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine
I’ll Be Alright
Somebody’s Knockin’
I’ll Be Seeing You

-Limited Edition “Denim Box” version – Bonus Tracks

Lonesome
Freight Train

buy-from-amazon


 

OVERVIEW

The ultimate goal of “I Still Do” is to provide variety and we can clearly see it in the smart selection of songs and the wide range of artists he chose to cover, including folk icon Bob Dylan (I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine) and blues singer Leroy Carr (Alabama Woman Blues). In addition, original compositions (Spiral, Catch the Blues) also make an appearance and add the final ingredient to the long-awaited blues blast called “I Still Do”.

The result is a consistently delightful, although quite expected, collection from Clapton that features his stimulating guitar solos, raspy vocal delivery and a dozen other credited musicians who play alongside him. Positively laidback, the album definitely grabs your attention with its bluesy easy-going and breezy aura that creates the perfect mood. The songs are rather homogeneous and once again perfectly aligned with Eric Clapton’s standards and practices of reviving and exploring old ways and meanings of music.

Some of the album’s finest moments of the record include the carelessly improvised “Spiral” on which he sings, “You don’t know how much this means to have this music in meI just keep playing these blues’hoping that I don’t lose”. In the gentle lullaby “Little Man, You’ve Had A Busy Day” we can enjoy his husky and calming vocal delivery that can’t but warm our hearts. The more upbeat spirit of the album is captured in Robert Johnson’s “Stones in My Passway” and JJ Cale’s “Somebody’s Knocking” on which Clapton handsomely portrays his confidence in playing and singing the blues. The dozy “I Will Be There” and “I’ll Be Alright” may slow down the enthusiasm of some people; however the album wraps things up in a very classy and fanciful, though a but nostalgic way. “I’ll Be Seeing You” portrays Clapton’s passion for jazz music and captivates with its dreamy lyrics.

“I Still Do” is a reflection of Clapton’s current, assured and calmed spirit – the days of chasing trends, looking for new ways to reach the public and focus on making smashing hit albums are over. At this point in his career, he is finally ready to do his own music in his own way. He sounds confident, genuine and most importantly he is finally comfortable in his own skin. “I Still Do” is definitely a reason enough to celebrate and acknowledge the dying breed of musicians like Eric Clapton who do everything with style and class. Thank you for being 71 and still creating such beautiful music, Eric!


 

 

“Can’t Let You Do It” (Official Lyric Video)

“SPIRAL”


 

Credits:
“Eric Clapton Announces Upcoming Release Of New Studio Album” by Scott Bernstein, retrieved from http://www.jambase.com/article/eric-clapton-announces-upcoming-release-of-new-studio-album
 “I Still Do” Official Wikipedia Page : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_Still_Do_%28album%29

[ Playlist ] Weekly MIXTAPE

’70s

Happy New Week, guys!

It’s time for my weekly mixtape. This time I have collected classic rock tunes only from the ‘70s and came up with this lovely playlist which will hopefully cheer you up and give you some strength for today. ‘70s was a decade full of so much awesomeness and most importantly – a decade of experimentation, music progress and rebirth that produced some of the greatest rock songs and artists ever…Let’s have a listen and try to have a great Monday!

PLAYLIST:

Van Halen – Runnin’ With The Devil (1978)
Pink Floyd – Shine On You Crazy Diamond (1975)
Led Zeppelin – All My Love (1979)
Eric Clapton – Cocaine (1977)
Guess Who – American Woman (1970)
Blondie – Heart of Glass (1978)
Boston – Peace of Mind (1976)
The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again (1971)
Blue Oyster Cult – (Don’t Fear) The Reaper (1976)
Queen – Somebody to Love (1976)


Van Halen – Runnin’ With The Devil (1978)

Pink Floyd – Shine On You Crazy Diamond (1975)

Led Zeppelin – All My Love (1979)

Eric Clapton – Cocaine (1977)

Guess Who – American Woman (1970)

Blondie – Heart of Glass (1978)

Boston – Peace of Mind (1976)

The Who – Won’t Get Fooled Again (1971)

Blue Oyster Cult – (Don’t Fear) The Reaper (1976)

Queen – Somebody to Love (1976)